Google Tech Talks: Artificial General Intelligence

When the AI field was founded over 50 years ago, it was squarely focused on the grand dream of creating software displaying general intelligence at the human level or beyond. Since that time the field has drifted in a direction Ray Kurzweil has called “Narrow AI”: the creation of intelligent software applications carrying out highly particular functions.

Dr. Ben Goertzel gives an interesting talk about the development of AGI – Artificial General Intelligence, the original ideas about what an AI is, in particular describing the Novamente AI engine.
Dr Ben Goertzel is the author of The Hidden Pattern: A Patternist Philosophy of Mind and Artificial General Intelligence (Cognitive Technologies).

Are We Ready For the Coming ‘Age of Abundance?’

Of all the forces that will impact business in the future, several mega-trends stand out: disruptions in technology, demographics and emerging markets.

This is a Big Think panel made up of Michael Schrage, MIT Sloan School of Management research fellow, theoretical physicist Dr. Michio Kaku, Peter Diamandis, Founder and Chairman of the X-Prize Foundation, and Isabel Aguilera, former CEO of Google’s Spain & Portugal operations.

TIME 10 Questions: Ray Kurzweil

This is a short TIME interview with Ray Kurzweil released on November 29th 2010. Questions are typical for those familiar with his work..singularity, exponential advancement in technology and longevity. Ray is positive and optimistic as always.

Ray Kurzweil on 2009 Longevity Conference

Famed inventor and futurist tell scientists gathered at the 2009 Longevity Conference that we are “very close to a tipping point in human history.” According to his projections, in 15 years we will be adding more than one year every year to YOUR lifespan.
It’s a very interesting lecture by a very interesting person. Kurzweil is known for his quite accurate predictions of the future so although some of the points he makes sound pretty incredible, they are actually very possible.

The Beauty of Diagrams

BBC Series in which mathematician Marcus du Sautoy explores the stories behind some of the most familiar scientific diagrams. Here we will see Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man, Issac Newton’s Prism, as well as the most well known diagrams of Nicolaus Copernicus and Florence Nightingale. Some of these diagrams are truly astounding examples of human’s ability to visualize complex concepts.

How Science Changed Our World

Professor Robert Winston presents his top ten scientific breakthroughs of the past 50 years. Tracing these momentous and wide-ranging discoveries, he meets a real-life bionic woman, one of the first couples to test the male contraceptive pill, and even some of his early IVF patients. He explores the origins of the universe, probes the inner workings of the human mind and sees the most powerful laser in the world. To finish, Professor Winston reveals the breakthrough he thinks is most significant.

CNN – Just Imagine: City Visions

This is a part of CNN’s documentary series; Just Imagine, in which Ken Yeang and Ross Lovegrove show how nature can inspire our living spaces and cities by fusing efficiency and beauty in things like skyscrapers and street lights. Very inspirational video, giving a glimpse of a brighter and greener future.

Larry Smarr – Supercomputing and the Human Brain

Larry Smarr discusses the state of the art in supercomputing, with a focus on how current computation compares to the human brain and when supercomputers will surpass human processing power. Current supercomputers are estimated to match the human visual cortex and will reach human brain’s computational ability within the next twenty years.

Robert Zubrin – The Case for Mars

Robert Zubrin is an American aerospace engineer and author, best known for his advocacy of manned Mars exploration. He was the driving force behind Mars Direct—a proposal intended to produce significant reductions in the cost and complexity of such a mission. Here is his talk about exploration and colonization of Mars, with all the technical details although the lecture is a bit aged, but still very interesting and funny at moments. It’s given to the 15th Annual Meeting of the Doctors for Disaster Preparedness held in San Diego, California; June 1997.

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