BBC – The Big Bang Machine

Professor Brian Cox visits Geneva to take a look around Cern’s Large Hadron Collider before this vast, 27km long machine is sealed off and a simulation experiment begins to try and create the conditions that existed just a billionth of a second after the Big Bang.

The Core

This is a BBC Horizon documentary about the Earth’s molten core.
Horizon follows scientists who are conducting experiments to recreate this core within their own laboratories, with surprising results.

The Planets

A bit aged, but definitely one of the most informative documentaries available on astronomy. Composed of 8 one hour long episodes, The Planets give us a history of the space age from both US and Russia’s perspective, detailing all the important events and scientific discoveries during that time. The sheer amount of information provided in this documentary puts many others I have watched to shame.

Ice Age Meltdown

18,000 years ago there was a sudden change in climate which ends a global freeze which had lasted for several thousands of years. Melting ice caps drive up sea levels to create coastlines we recognize today and great glaciers thaw dramatically to re-sculpture the landscape.

This is a Nat Geo Wild documentary, exploring the Earth’s global warming and cooling cycles. It gives some valuable information on the conditions which dictate the changing temperatures on Earth – very educational.

Richard Dawkins: The Greatest Show on Earth

A documentary made upon the book: The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution, by the biologist Professor Richard Dawkins, who has spent a lifetime educating the general public about the basic principles and mechanism behind the evolution.

The Hawking Paradox

This is a BBC production documentary on Stephen Hawking’s work on black holes and the implications of his theory. Stephen Hawking is probably the most famous physicist in the whole world. He became famous for his work on the Big Bang theory as well as his research on black holes. Science had long predicted that if a sufficiently large star collapsed at the end of its life, all the matter left in the star would be crushed into an infinitely small point with infinite gravity and infinite density – a singularity. Hawking laid the foundations of black hole thermodynamics, a theory that explains a lot, but also appears to break some basic physical laws.

The Day The Universe Changed

The Day the Universe Changed is a ten-part documentary television series presented by science historian James Burke. The series tells a series of stories of how specific scientific and technological advances have shaped the Western way of life.
The title comes from the philosophical idea that the universe essentially only exists as you perceive it through what you know; therefore, if you change your perception of the universe with new knowledge, you have essentially changed the universe itself.
Very interesting and insightful documentary series for anyone interested in the history of science.

The Story of One

A math history documentary from PBS. Hosted by the well known Monty Python member, Terry Jones, a historian with a typical British sense of humor. Also appearing in the documentary is the mathematician Marcus du Sautoy, often appearing in documentaries that have anything to do with mathematics. Together they are telling us a story about the history of the number 1 which soon turns into a history of the number systems in general. Although this documentary is not any kind of eye-opener, it’s still filled with many interesting and fun to know trivia.

The Beauty of Diagrams

BBC Series in which mathematician Marcus du Sautoy explores the stories behind some of the most familiar scientific diagrams. Here we will see Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man, Issac Newton’s Prism, as well as the most well known diagrams of Nicolaus Copernicus and Florence Nightingale. Some of these diagrams are truly astounding examples of human’s ability to visualize complex concepts.

Is Seeing Believing?

This is a documentary from BBC Horizon about sensory illusions. It’s fascinating to see in how many ways can our brains be fooled. Most popular are of course optical illusions, included are the illusions with colors where our brain perceives the same color as different depending on the surroundings, or the illusions with 3D space. However, all of our senses can be fooled in different ways.

Now the big question is the following. Is this simply an error in the way our brains work, or is it there for a reason? What if those errors our brains do, are actually an advantage in some way? Could they have evolved and prove useful?

Page 2 of 1112345...10...Last »